25 YEARS AGO

Dr. John Kitzhaber said he supports President Bill Clinton’s health care reform efforts but not without a few reservations.

I give the president really high marks for putting this issue on the front burner,” he said. “This is not something we can ignore. The costs creating it are going up too fast.”

Kitzhaber said, “The political concern I have has to do with the process or lack of process by which the Clinton administration developed this plan.”

The candidate for governor said the Clinton administration developed the plan behind closed doors, consulting with relatively few, and is now attempting to “sell” the plan.

• Drivers traveling east on East Gladys Street have to get used to a different lane scheme at Highway 395.

In the past, the left lane had been a left turn or through lane. The right lane had been for right turns only. That has changed. the left lane is now for left turns only. Through traffic should use the right lane.

“Our phones are ringing,” Hermiston Police Chief Grant Asher said. “People are irate.”

Asher said there have been incidents where verbal confrontations have ensued from the confusion.

50 YEARS AGO

A solid 86 percent of registered voters in Umatilla County turned up to vote Tuesday, Nov. 5, says Umatilla County Clerk Jessie Bell, in an election that saw the local returns coming in earlier than in many years past. 19,102 voters were registered says Miss Bell, and the breakdown between party affiliation follows: 9,953 Democrats, 8,667 Republicans and 482 others.

• The coveted position of Speaker of the House in the Oregon legislature has gone to Robert Smith, the 36-year-old Republican from Burns who has served in the House for four terms in different capacities ranging from membership on the House Highways Committee to majority leader during the last session.

His selection over Stafford Hansell, local hog rancher, was decided by the 38 Republicans who again control the House, in a closed-door session in Salem.

75 YEARS AGO

Robert Carlton, son of Mrs. Esther Strasser of Stanfield, spent a short furlough here recently following active duty overseas. He is the holder of the air medal with nine oak leaf clusters, his campaign ribbons showing service in Africa, South America and the Italian campaign, including Sicily and Italy. He was granted a short leave prior to reporting back for duty at Salt Lake City where he will transfer to a flying squadron flying the new superbombers, the Boeing B-29s.

Carlton, an engineer-gunner on a Flying Fortress, has served two years in the air forces, nine months of which were spent overseas. He has engaged in more than 50 combat missions in the European war zone, with more than 300 hours in the Flying Fortresses on combat missions to his credit. He has been recommended for the prized Distinguished Flying Cross.

He is credited officially with having destroyed two Nazi planes, a 190 Messerschmitt and another.

100 YEARS AGO

• Turkey pickers, plant managers and others interested in the activities of the local plant of the Eastern Oregon Turkey Growers Association were all smiles Wednesday. The reason for the exuberant spirit was a “pat on the back” as it were from Charles A. Cole of Salem, federal and state supervisor of turkey grading.

Making his annual visit to Hermiston Wednesday he stated that the birds in this area were the best he had seen this year. He especially commended local growers for the quality of their turkeys, stating he never had to worry about the quality of Hermiston turkeys because they were always of the higher grade. He also gave the plant its best “bill of health” it has ever had.

Did Hermiston celebrate the real news of the signing of the armistice? Why of course she did, and in a manner that left no doubt but what the war was over. It was no small celebration like the one when the fake news came, for the real grand parade Monday, with real band music, was something to conjure with for years to come.

Echo and Stanfield hove to in like manner, and when the three towns joined force the procession that wended its way back and forth between the above places was six miles long.

It will take a long time to finally adjust to peace proper, for Germany is now in the throes of internal turmoil, but the signing of the armistice means a beginning of the end, for which everyone is thankful.

• After a battle of three weeks in an endeavor to stamp out Spanish influenza in this neighborhood, Mayor McKenzie this Saturday evening will proclaim the lifting of the quarantine, which will admit of church-going people to attend worship Sunday and everything to resume normal condition Monday. Simultaneously Chairman J.D. Watson of the local school board will serve notice of the re-opening of the Hermiston School on Monday morning of the coming week. Mr. Watson also desires to notify teachers and pupils that school will take up fifteen minutes earlier each morning and the lunch hour shortened by that much at noon. This will add an half-hour to normal school time, and is being done to make up for lost time on account of the enforced vacation.

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