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Hermiston History: Nixon wins close race

Published on November 6, 2018 6:00PM

HH file photo. Jim Martin, Kip Clark and Jim Jenkins prepare to go hunting in 1968.

HH file photo. Jim Martin, Kip Clark and Jim Jenkins prepare to go hunting in 1968.

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HH file photo. Danielle Malan, Crystal Minor, Cami Idzerda, Joan Gibson, Jim Garcia and Vicente Guzmán made up the cast of a performance of

HH file photo. Danielle Malan, Crystal Minor, Cami Idzerda, Joan Gibson, Jim Garcia and Vicente Guzmán made up the cast of a performance of "El Niño Diego" in 1993.

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HH file photo. Stacie Johnson lets fly with one of her seven assists while Danielle Piquet and Lynette Hicket look on during a Hermiston High School volleyball game against Gresham in 1993.

HH file photo. Stacie Johnson lets fly with one of her seven assists while Danielle Piquet and Lynette Hicket look on during a Hermiston High School volleyball game against Gresham in 1993.

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25 YEARS AGO

Nov. 9, 1993

The old artemisia factory on the Umatilla County Fairgrounds, a Hermiston fixture for most of its history, has fallen to the wrecker’s ball.

“There’s a lot of rotten in it,” fairgrounds maintenance man Doug Moyer said of the wood-frame structure. “If she ever caught fire, she’d take out that whole city block.”

It was the scene of a small electrical fire during last summer’s fair.

The almost 65-year-old building was used as storage for the fair for the last several years. It also housed a small shop. Originally, the building was home to a small factory that made a remedy for roundworm out of artemisia, a family of aromatic herbs that includes sagebrush.

• The possibility of a closed Hermiston High School campus became less of a reality Tuesday night after four of seven school board members said they would not recommend the idea based on the results of a feasibility study.

The board took no action on the matter, but decided to keep the issue open for discussion at future meetings if the public supported a closed campus policy.

50 YEARS AGO

Nov. 7, 1968

In a presidential race that will go down in history as the closest popular vote ever, Republican Richard M. Nixon defeated Hubert H. Humphrey with the pivotal state, Illinois, adding 26 electoral votes to Nixon’s 261 and boosting his total to 287, giving him 17 more votes than the magic 270 needed to wrap up the election.

Had none of the contenders reached the 270 electoral mark, then by federal law the election would be thrown into the House of Representatives. The see-saw battle election night saw Nixon and Humphrey slugging it out toe to toe with popular vote percentages at 43 percent each, while George Wallace muddied the water with 14 percent. For this reason alone, the cause for election of a president by popular vote instead of the electoral college system has perhaps gained strength.

Nixon will have with him as number two man in the White House Spiro T. Agnew of Maryland, a lawyer of Greek parents labeled as a dynamic liberal in political circles.

75 YEARS AGO

Nov. 11, 1943

“No, we have no coal and we don’t know just when we will get any,” was the reply coal buyers received this week from local fuel dealers.

The situation is no laughing matter as many residents failed to take heed during the summer months when at lest two carloads of coal were sent down the tracks because no storage space was available. The past week saw several nights of quite cold weather and serious thought should be given towards preparing for the months ahead.

• The Umatilla Ordinance Depot has boosted its payroll deduction for the purchase of War Savings Bonds very materially. Several departments saw 100 percent participation so far. Many of the divisions are over the 10 percent deduction goal and the goal of the Depot is to get everyone participating in the payroll savings at least 10 percent.

We are glad to see those who can put most or all of their checks into bonds do so. Those who can and do put their salaries into bonds are to be commended. On the other hand, we remembers that our boys at the front have no choice as to whether they will fight; we have the freedom to choose our work, our place of work and what we do with our money. Let us back our boys and put all we can into bonds.

100 YEARS AGO

Nov. 9, 1918

There was not much interest shown in the city election on the part of voters Tuesday, the state ticket being the luring object.

Thus it was that only 31 votes were cast, but they were sufficient to put back in the mayoralty and aldermanic chairs six members of the present council, with B.F. Knapp added as the seventh member. He was elected in place of A.L. Larson, who in turn was elected treasurer to succeed F.A. Phelps. Several ladies were honored with complimentary votes, there being 10 of the 31 scattered around thusly.

• How many of the readers of this paper have a brother, a son or a relative in the army? Nearly all the readers have. Do you want to see him choke to death or burn his lungs out as a result of a German gas attack? No, not if in your power to prevent. All right then, it is within your power to prevent, says M.C. Shrock, county agricultural agent.

The American army gas mask is the most effective mask made. No deaths have resulted when masks were properly applied. It is the shortage of material with which to make these gas masks that prompts this appeal to you.

Charcoal made from coconut shells was formerly used as an absorbent for the poisonous element. But the gas defense division have used up all of the available supply of coconut shells. They must resort to other hard nut shells.

Peach pits, prune pits and walnuts seem unimportant things to us at home, but to the boys in the trenches and to the war department they are vital. Gather all you can and bring or send them to the Red Cross headquarters.





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