Home News Local News

Hermiston History: Letters to Bill Clinton

A look into the Hermiston Herald’s archives 25, 50, 75 and 100 years ago

Published on December 5, 2017 4:36PM

HH file photo. Members of the Hermiston Future Farmers of America Aaron Bartoscheck, left, and Joey Cassens release 196 tiny troutraised by FFA members into Minnehaha Creek 25 years ago.

HH file photo. Members of the Hermiston Future Farmers of America Aaron Bartoscheck, left, and Joey Cassens release 196 tiny troutraised by FFA members into Minnehaha Creek 25 years ago.

HH file photo. A turkey on bridge road may have been breathing a sigh of relief after passing through the Thanksgiving holiday without becoming a meal.

HH file photo. A turkey on bridge road may have been breathing a sigh of relief after passing through the Thanksgiving holiday without becoming a meal.

HH file photo. Digging of a new city well in the northeast area of Hermiston was nearing completion 50 year ago.

HH file photo. Digging of a new city well in the northeast area of Hermiston was nearing completion 50 year ago.


25 YEARS AGO

December 8, 1992

•A collection of letters to President-elect Bill Clinton from Hermiston students were published in the Hermiston Herald:

Dear President-elect Clinton, My name is Stefani Workman. I am a fourth grade student at Sunset Elementary School in Hermiston, Oregon. I am writing to give you my ideas for schools in the future. I think people would learn better if we had smaller classes, more helpers, if desks were bigger and if we had more money for supply and equipment.

Sincerely,

Stefani Workman

Fourth grade

Dear President-Elect Bill Clinton,

Congratulations! You’re the new president! Bill I have a couple questions for you. What are you going to do about our education? Are you going to raise the thinking level? Or are you going to lower it? Or keep it the same? Bill what is going to happen to the sports? There’s one more thing what is going to happen to taxes?

Kim White

Sixth grade.

P.S. I wish you luck in the White house. May the best decisions be yours.

Dear President-Elect Bill Clinton, Congratulations! for being picked for president “93” I am really proud that you got elected. I hope you will lower taxes. And that if you could try and put people on the streets in homes and that way if you lower taxes the poor people could pay taxes. I am really glad now that in Hermiston Oregon we have new baseball fields because I love playing baseball. I even wish that there were NO drugs in the whole entire world so that know one would get killed and that there were no guns to people like that the only people who should have guns are the hunters not poachers. Well hope you have fun being president.

Your friend,

Starr McCoy

Sixth grade

50 YEARS AGO

December 7, 1967

•Customers of Pacific Power Light Company in Hermiston, Stanfield, Echo and Umatilla were without power for 44 minutes. The interruption in service was caused by damage to the main 69,000-volt transmission line serving these communities from Kennewick. A power pole near Kennewick caught fire and severed a section of line as it fell. The fire may have been started by gun shots to an insulator.

•Drilling has reached a depth of 560 feet on the new city well. Site of the new well is in the northeast section of the city where officials are hoping for a producing well of 2,000 gallons per minute at the 1,000 foot level. J.A. Strasser Co. of Portland has the $59,327.50 drilling contract.

75 YEARS AGO

December 10,1942

•The most recent Hermiston business firm casualty of the war is the Pheasant Café, one of the larger cafés of this city. The firm has been opened for the past six weeks by Mr. and Mrs. Claude VanArsdale who had purchased the business from Ben O’Conner. The VanArsdales relinquished their equity, however, on Sunday and Mr. O’Conner decided to close it indefinitely. Mr. O’Conner stated that he might open up again around the first of March, depending greatly on the conditions of the war. He also plans to close the Pastime after the first of the year.

•A considerable letup in petty crimes and drunkenness has been experienced here in the last two weeks, according to records at the local police station. Excessive liquor still leads the parade as the chief offender.

•The nine housing units under construction in Hermiston under the sponsorship of the Hermiston Housing Corporation are progressing nicely and should be ready for occupancy by the first of the year, providing weather conditions do not hamper the work. The last house was shingled this week and the doors and windows will be installed this weekend. The houses will be sold by the corporation under the sponsorship of the Federal Housing Administration. Six of the units have been sold to date, leaving three more available for any one wishing to purchase a new home.

100 YEARS AGO

December 15, 1917

•Poultry must be produced next year in places where it has not been produced before, and everywhere that poultry has been produced that production must be increased. It is necessary that people in the country and in towns answer alike to this call. Farms and backyards must both do their bit, for the doubling of our poultry production next year is an indispensable item in the nation’s food production program — a program which must be carried out if we are to win the war. The meat supplies available for European use are short. Meat must be supplied if the war is won by the forces who fight for freedom. The war will be won if we fail in food production — but not won by us. We must understand what will happen if we do not provide the enormous quantities of food stuffs that the allies cannot produce for themselves. Are we going to feed on chickens and eggs? Of course not. But by greatly increasing our production of chickens and eggs ourselves we will, naturally, eat that much less beef and pork. In turn, that beef and pork can be sent to Europe. The United States Department of Agriculture calls upon the country to double poultry production next year. That can be done if the farms will keep an average of 100 hens instead of a 40 hen average, as at present.

• Lera Newton, a trained nurse of Corvallis, while in Hermiston on a business visit informed The Herald that she decided to locate permanently at Irrigon, where her mother Mrs. Delle Newton lives. With the coming of the lady a long felt want will have been fulfilled in this project, for hereafter those desiring the services of a nurse can secure Miss Newton by addressing her at Irrigon, Oregon.

•A new agricultural industry has been started in this government project this year that is destined to become a money-making factor and rank with alfalfa, dairying and other diversified farming items. We have all heard, both in verse and rhyme, of the waving fields of sorghum cane in the south, and many here have witnessed its production in those states where it is grown in abundance, but none of us evidently ever conceived the idea that the cereal plant would thrive this far north. This was in part caused by ranchers having become inoculated with a desire to raise alfalfa, stock and vegetables, with the result that they had no time to give attention to scientific researches for the production of any foreign agricultural product.





Marketplace

Share and Discuss

Guidelines

User Comments