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HERMISTON HISTORY: Hispanic Youth Leadership Conference attracts 400

Published on November 7, 2017 7:03PM

Bleachers at Hermiston High School are filled with students from the region attending the annual Hispanic Youth Leadership Conference in 1992.

HH file photo

Bleachers at Hermiston High School are filled with students from the region attending the annual Hispanic Youth Leadership Conference in 1992.

Riverside High Schoo FFA member Jim Lunders feeds a few of his 100-head champion Suffolk Sheep in 1992.

HH file photo

Riverside High Schoo FFA member Jim Lunders feeds a few of his 100-head champion Suffolk Sheep in 1992.

25 YEARS AGO

November 10, 1992


•At a time when too much negative news has focused on gangs and racial divisions in our community, a Hispanic Youth Conference sounded a positive note — and it was trumpeted in a big way. More than 400 students from Hermiston and the surrounding areas attended the conference to learn about education, careers, college opportunities, scholarships and coping with society. The volume level in the gym was a testament to the enthusiasm for the event. The goal of the conference was to stress the value of staying in school and using education as a ladder to success.

•Some might see a 4-H project out of control, but for Jim Lunders his 100 head of Suffolk sheep represent a growing college fund. Lunders, 16, started his flock when he was 9 years old and has been carefully adding to and selling championship sheep and lambs ever since. At the beginning of 1991, Lunders’ inventory was worth $5,900. By the beginning of 1992, under the leadership of Riverside High School FFA adviser Rick Danielson, the value of his sheep reached $17,023.

•Deputy Jack Stewart has recently returned from two weeks of special schooling related to homicide investigations. A member of the Umatilla County Major Crime Team, Stewart is assigned in Hermiston to the Criminal Division of the Sheriff’s Office. Classes were conducted by the Southern Police Institute in Salem. Among the topics were homicide scene investigations, serial killers and other serial crimes, forensic lab instruction and blood stain pattern evidence.


50 YEARS AGO

November 9, 1967


•For the first time in nine years, Stanfield has defeated Umatilla in football. The Tigers did it playing on their home field Friday with a stingy defense and a pair of seven-yard touchdown runs for a 13-0 win.

•Claude Stamper was honored as Chief Scout by Scout Troop 657 of Echo at a meeting at the Echo Methodist Church. The Court of Honor was conducted by Erv Williams, Scout Master and officially opened as “Claude Stamper Night.” Stamper was awarded a plaque and the title of Chief Scout for his services to the units of Echo as Neighborhood Commissioner. The court of Honor was presided over by Joe Nichols, Lester Murray, Pat Umphfries, Bob Lilly and Stamper. Umphfries and D.Z. Penney were awarded pins by Scouts Marvin Dumler and Brad Williams.


75 YEARS AGO

November 8, 1942


•Hermiston High School student body last week turned over the entire amount of money raised recently through a scrap metal drive to the Hermiston Red Cross Chapter which is sponsoring a recreation room at the Pendleton air base. The sum of $205.00 was given to Mrs. F.B. Belt, local chairman, at a student body assembly.

•The first turkey pool of the 1943 season got underway Tuesday at the local plant of the Eastern Oregon Turkey Growers. According to C.A. Flanigan, plant manager, a sufficient crew was on hand Tuesday morning but more pickers could be added very conveniently if more applied.

•Real and personal property taxes assessed at $28,321.93 for 1942-43 on its property in Umatilla County will be paid to the sheriff in Pendleton this weekend by Pacific Power & Light Co., according to A.M. Thrasher, local manager for the company here.


100 YEARS AGO

November 10, 1917


•Monday of this week witnessed the sale of another large block of irrigated land in this valley, when the First National Bank sold forty acres in “Cottonwood Bend” in the Umatilla project to Christian Seitz of Echo. Mr. Seitz, who is a wheat farmer on Butter Creek, is going to get busy right away clearing and leveling so as to have the tract ready for spring seeding.

•A.L. Luce and family and Ed Johnson and family, ranchers from Jefferson County, arrived here Monday to become permanent settlers in this valley. The gentlemen recently purchased tracts in the Minnehaha district from the Umatilla Farm Lands Co., and since their arrival have begun outlining respective improvements on their places.

•Postmaster J.A. Young returned home from Portland Sunday morning, after having been there a couple of days again testifying against Frank Pelisser, the yeggman who was one of the robbers that burglarized the local post office some time ago.



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